The Centre for Studies in Aging & Health is pleased to announce that the Southeastern Ontario Portal for Advance Care Planning (ACP) and Health Care Consent (HCC) website is up and ready for your feedback and recommendations.  The site has been developed to provide information that is important to Health Care Providers and people living in Ontario.

We invite you to participate in the user-testing feedback survey.

In this community-based study we assessed the implementation feasibility and impact of the ‘Frailty Portal’ in the identification, raising awareness of, care planning and delivery of appropriate care for the frail population in community primary care practice. Primary Healthcare (PHC) providers regularly encounter frail persons in their daily clinical work.

Pre-frailty and frailty is an example of an elder care issue that, when identified and treated, may negatively impact quality metrics for the simple reasons that older adults don’t respond as well to treatment as younger cohorts.

The normal aging process is characterized by a progression of physiologic events that occur throughout the life cycle. Changes associated with aging occur throughout the body and are most prominent in the later years. Changes in the musculoskeletal system begin to occur after the third decade and continue into the eighth and ninth decades. The frailty syndrome can be described as a culmination of the effects of these changes on the human body.

The majority of cancer incidence and mortality occurs in individuals aged older than 65 years, and the number of older adults with cancer is projected to significantly increase secondary to the aging of the US population. As such, understanding the changes accompanying age in the context of the cancer patient is of critical importance.

Frailty has important implications for the care needs of older adults and how those needs are met. By recognizing frailty and measuring it objectively, clinicians can better engage patients and their loved ones in difficult discussions about treatment plans and prognosis, and ultimately deliver better palliative care.

There is emerging evidence of the role of certain nutrients as risk factors for frailty. However, people eat food, rather than nutrients, and no previous study has examined the association between dietary patterns empirically derived from food consumption and the risk of frailty in older adults.

Frailty is a biological syndrome that reflects a state of decreased physiological reserve and vulnerability to stressors. Upward of 20 frailty assessment tools have been developed, with most tools revolving around the core phenotypic domains of frailty—slow walking speed, weakness, inactivity, exhaustion, and shrinking—as measured by physical performance tests and questionnaires.

Frailty assessment provides a means of identifying older adults most vulnerable to adverse outcomes. Attention to frailty in clinical practice is more likely with better understanding of its prevalence and associations with patient characteristics. We sought to provide national estimates of frailty in older people.

Many frail older adults are thin, weak, and undernourished; this component of frailty remains a critical concern in the geriatric field. However, there is also strong evidence that excessive adiposity contributes to frailty by reducing the ability of older adults to perform physical activities and increasing metabolic instability. Our scoping review explores the impact of being obese on physical frailty in older adults by summarizing the state of the science for both clinical markers of physical function and biomarkers for potential underlying causes of obesity-related decline. 

Pages