This report from the Canadian Institute for Health Information includes data on the most commonly used drugs, chronic conditions being treated by prescription medications, public drug program spending, how many seniors were using potentially inappropriate medications and how drug usage by seniors differs for those living in long-term care.  

Wed. Dec. 6th at 12 noon EST, Nick Bansback and Logan Trenaman of the University of British Columbia will be talking about a new effort being made in Canada to involve patients in their own healthcare, and to help improve their experiences with care. Part of this effort means asking patients about their experiences in the hospital. Some important types of questions involve asking the patients what was most important to them in the hospital and some good or bad experiences they had there. To ask these types of questions, researchers are using a questionnaire called the Canadian Patient Experience Survey. The survey covers 48 different aspects about hospital care. Researchers think some aspects will matter a lot to some patients, while others will be less important to other patients. This study focused on elderly Canadians, and helped healthcare administrators understand which parts of hospital care experiences are most and least important to patients. Register here.

Wed. Nov. 22nd 12 noon EST, Rick Sawatzky and Marian Krawczyk of Trinity Western University will discuss a project that involved working with clinicians, patients and family caregivers and will address issues related to integrating and evaluating a quality of life assessment and practice support system in palliative homecare nursing. Register here.

On Wed. Oct. 25th at 12 noon EST Heather Keller of the University of Waterloo will be talking about this program focused on implementing a best practice algorithnm in five hospitals in four provinces to understand the process of implementation, resource requirements and patient reported outcomes. Register here.

On Wed. Oct. 11th at 12 noon EST Cheryl Forchuk of the Lawson Health Research Institute will be talking about a project testing TELEPROM-G on tablets which allowed participants to self-assess at home and communicate with their health care workers in "real-time" by video. Register here.

The authors conducted a qualitative survey which was sent to a number of European end-of-life care organizations.  Their findings led them to conclude that when diversity is given serious consideration it provides an opportunity to explore different perspectives at the ethical foundation of end-of-life care.

This literature review and current state assessment provides an annotated bibliography and was a part of a knowledge translation tools project.

The authors undertook a scoping review focused on answering 5 questions related to population health patterns, health risks and ouctomes of ethnocultural older adults compared to other older adults, unmet health needs, health care service use and health promotion and disease prevention within the Canadian context.

Late in life immigrants are often at risk of psychological stress, and social isolation because of language barriers, small social networks, and cultural differences from their host society. It has been noted that the social networks of those who migrate late in life tend to be very limited. The present study suggests that better family relation, social networking, financial support, and accessing health care would be the key to address the problem.

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brainXchange, Alzheimer Society of Canada and the CCNA proudly presents Dr. Serge Gauthier as he discusses the new and evolving elements of research on dementia. This webinar will take place on Sept. 13th from 12:00 - 13:00 EDT. Registration is free, but spaces are limited.

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