This article analyzes the effects of societal perception on treatment of the elderly and how people view and perceive the aging process varies greatly from culture to culture.

The elderly population of the future may not look much like the old people of today. It will be less white and with fewer native English speakers. That means physicians, nurses, social workers and health aides will have to adapt to our increasingly diverse society.

Rates of caregiving vary somewhat by ethnicity. For example, among the U.S. adult population, approximately one-fifth of both the non-Hispanic White and African-American populations are providing care to a Asian caregiverloved one, while a slightly lower percentage of Asian-Americans — 18 percent — and Hispanic Americans — 16 percent — are engaged in caregiving.

This presentation aims to raise awareness of and enhance the care for people at end of life including how to understand how cultural factors influence end of life decision making.  

Quality palliative care helps you honour your culture, spirituality and traditions. At LivingMyCulture.ca, people from various cultures share their stories and wisdom about living with serious illness, end of life and grief to support others.

This review highlights that most research has focused on decision-making. There were fewer studies exploring different cultural and spiritual experiences at the EoL and interventions to improve EoL care. Interventions evaluated were largely educational in nature rather than service oriented.

Within the process of providing end-of-life care, cultural factors can significantly influence patients’ reactions to their illnesses and the decisions they make. As a patient and his or her family transitions from point to point in the process of coping with the serious illness, culture may impact key aspects.

The focus of this article will be on cross-cultural issues at the end of life for ethnically and culturally diverse groups in the United States. The health care provider must have a clear understanding and recognition of the unique and specific influences culture has on a patient’s behavior, attitudes, preferences, and decisions around end-of-life care. 

This 3 day conference will explore emerging trends and best practices that include relationship-centred care and highlight innovative ways to build capacity through community engagement, education, research and technology; cultivating compassion and dignity in an aging society.

This one day course on fall prevention is sponsored by Simcoe Muskoka Integrated Fall Strategy. Topics being discussed include sarcopenia & osteporosis, updates in footwear safety, intra LHIN collaboration and a new approach to fall prevention in older adults. 

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