There are many senior living options for aging seniors. At SeniorGuidance.org, they are dedicated to helping seniors, their loved ones and their caregivers to find appropriate senior facilities and communities that may be of interest to seniors who are looking to retire or need special care.

This reading list provides links to and summaries of a variety of open source resources related to the care of older immigrants with specific attention to end-of-life care. 2 pages. 

This handout from the Canadian Research Network for Care in the Community provides an overview of why it is important to focus on diversity in informal caregiving, strategies to address the challenges and a listing of available supports.

This paper examines specific intergeneraional and family dimensions of the immigrant experience in Canada, generally, and in particular, the Region of Peel, Ontario. This analysis is organized around the concept of lifespan or lifecycle groups.  A section on the migration stresses faced by couples is also included. 

Late in life immigrants are often at risk of psychological stress, and social isolation because of language barriers, small social networks, and cultural differences from their host society. It has been noted that the social networks of those who migrate late in life tend to be very limited. The present study suggests that better family relation, social networking, financial support, and accessing health care would be the key to address the problem.

Don’t feel ready to seek out support and get out of your isolation? For many immigrants talking about feelings and seeking help is a challenge they must first overcome in order to feel less isolated.

Social isolation is a reality experienced by many seniors and particularly immigrant and refugee seniors. Even though it is not easy to recognize, it has significant health, social, and economic consequences. The Government of Canada has taken an active interest in the issue of social isolation as have provincial governments. At the community level, several organizations individually and in partnerships, have been actively engaged in offering programs and services to seniors at risk for social isolation.

The elderly population of the future may not look much like the old people of today. It will be less white and with fewer native English speakers. That means physicians, nurses, social workers and health aides will have to adapt to our increasingly diverse society.

Rates of caregiving vary somewhat by ethnicity. For example, among the U.S. adult population, approximately one-fifth of both the non-Hispanic White and African-American populations are providing care to a Asian caregiverloved one, while a slightly lower percentage of Asian-Americans — 18 percent — and Hispanic Americans — 16 percent — are engaged in caregiving.

The following is a resource guide created for seniors’ caretakers designed to provide moving advice that touches on the unique needs of seniors and their caregivers when moving to a senior living community.

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