Highlights of this issue include a reading list on "Understanding Care Issues of Older Immigrants", updates from Age-Friendly Communities Ontario Outreach Initiative, Alzheimer Society of Ontario, Baycrest, Bruyère Research Institute, Ontario Neurotrauma Foundation, Regional Geriatrics Program, Senior Friendly Hospitals, news of a funding opportunity from the Canadian Frailty Network and a listing of upcoming events. Sign up to receive Linkages directly here.

On Wed. Oct. 11th from 12-1pm EDT, presenters Susan Bonomo and Jennifer Wright as they discuss their fall prevention strategy.  For more information or to register click here.

On November 23rd at the National Institute on Ageing at Ryerson University, this conference brings together experts, thought leaders, practitioners and delegates to "widen the lens" to look at the models, practices and stakeholders that will be need to support older adults to age in place. A varietyof age-friendly perspectives will be explored.

This reading list provides links to and summaries of a variety of open source resources related to the substance misuse and abuse in older adults. Prescription, legal and illicit substances are included. 2 pages. 

The authors provide a concise overview on why age specific approaches to managing substance abuse are needed.

Wed. Dec. 6th at 12 noon EST, Nick Bansback and Logan Trenaman of the University of British Columbia will be talking about a new effort being made in Canada to involve patients in their own healthcare, and to help improve their experiences with care. Part of this effort means asking patients about their experiences in the hospital. Some important types of questions involve asking the patients what was most important to them in the hospital and some good or bad experiences they had there. To ask these types of questions, researchers are using a questionnaire called the Canadian Patient Experience Survey. The survey covers 48 different aspects about hospital care. Researchers think some aspects will matter a lot to some patients, while others will be less important to other patients. This study focused on elderly Canadians, and helped healthcare administrators understand which parts of hospital care experiences are most and least important to patients. Register here.

Wed. Nov. 22nd 12 noon EST, Rick Sawatzky and Marian Krawczyk of Trinity Western University will discuss a project that involved working with clinicians, patients and family caregivers and will address issues related to integrating and evaluating a quality of life assessment and practice support system in palliative homecare nursing. Register here.

On Wed. Oct. 25th at 12 noon EST Heather Keller of the University of Waterloo will be talking about this program focused on implementing a best practice algorithnm in five hospitals in four provinces to understand the process of implementation, resource requirements and patient reported outcomes. Register here.

On Wed. Sept. 27th at 12 noon EST, Sharon Kaasalainen & Pamela Durepos of McMaster University and Tamara Sussman of McGill University will be talking about implementation processes, clinical and administrative tools, and educational materials that will inform how qualified health professionals and decision-makers can improve the delivery of palliative care in long-term care. Register here.

On Tues. Sept. 12th from 12-1pm, Deepha Romuwalt will be reviewing the critical elements of balance involving central and peripheral mechanisms and their interplay.  Register here.

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