Highlights of this issue include a reading list on "Falls and Neurological Disorders", updates from Age-Friendly Communities Ontario Outreach Initiative, Baycrest, Brainxchange, Bruyère Research Institute, Ontario Neurotrauma Foundation, Regional Geriatrics Program, Senior Friendly Hospitals, information about Change Day Ontario, National Bereavement Day and a platform grant from the Brain Foundation Canada as well as a listing of upcoming events. Sign up to receive Linkages directly here.

This reading list provides links to and summaries of a variety of open source resources related to falls and neurological disorders. Resources related to Parkinson's disease, Mulitple Sclerosis, Stroke, Traumatic Brain Injury, Dementia and/or Cognitive Impairment are included. 4 pages. 

This article describes a retrospective evaluation of assessments from the community delivery of the Free From Falls (FFF) multi-factorial fall prevention group exercise and education program that was launched in 2011 by the National Multiple Sclerosis Society. The findings suggest improved outcomes for people with MS such as improved balance confidence, balance performance, functional mobility and reduced falls.

This review aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions designed to reduce the rate of falls in individuals with MS. It compared single, multiple and multifactorial interventions.

This publication includes examples of research that have the potential to broaden approaches to fall prevention research. This includes information relevant to the care of older adults.

The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate existing evidence on the effectiveness and safety of Tai Chi to inform guidelines to clinicians to improve symptom management in individuals with MS.  While this review didn’t focus specifically on older adults, its findings regarding health outcomes particularly functional balance and quality of life can support its incorporation into individualized multifactorial fall prevention interventions.

This longitudinal cohort study investigated the validity of the 7-item Falls Efficacy Scale-International (FES-I) as a measure of fear of falling in people with MS. Scores were found significant in predicting recurrent falls in the following 3 months.

This article provides an overview of considerations related to fall risk for those with MS and point to the need for further research.