On May 10th 2017,  Dr. Kenneth Rockwood presented this webinar to address questions regarding risk of dementia, approach to dementia diagnosis and special considerations for those who are frail.  Watch the recording here.

This reading list provides links to and summaries of a variety of open source resources related to frailty and older adults.  4 pages.

Paige Moorhouse, Tara Sampalli and Ashley Harnish presented this webinar about their community-based study where they assessed the implementation feasibility and impact of the "Frailty Portal" in the identification, raising awareness of, care planning and delivery of appropriate care for the frail population in community primary care practice.  Watch the recording of the webinar here.

Pre-frailty and frailty is an example of an elder care issue that, when identified and treated, may negatively impact quality metrics for the simple reasons that older adults don’t respond as well to treatment as younger cohorts.

The normal aging process is characterized by a progression of physiologic events that occur throughout the life cycle. Changes associated with aging occur throughout the body and are most prominent in the later years. Changes in the musculoskeletal system begin to occur after the third decade and continue into the eighth and ninth decades. The frailty syndrome can be described as a culmination of the effects of these changes on the human body.

It is important to establish whether frailty among older individuals is reversible with nutritional, physical, or cognitive interventions, singly or in combination. We compared the effects of 6-month-duration interventions with nutritional supplementation, physical training, cognitive training, and combination treatment vs control in reducing frailty among community-dwelling prefrail and frail older persons.

This study shows that the level of frailty was distributed along the socioeconomic gradient in both higher and lower income countries such that those individuals with less education and income were more likely to be frail. 

Frailty is a well known and accepted term to clinicians working with older people. The study aim was to determine whether an intervention could reduce frailty and improve mobility.

The majority of cancer incidence and mortality occurs in individuals aged older than 65 years, and the number of older adults with cancer is projected to significantly increase secondary to the aging of the US population. As such, understanding the changes accompanying age in the context of the cancer patient is of critical importance.

Randomized controlled trials of community-dwelling older adults, defined as frail according to physical function and physical difficulties in activities of daily living (ADL). Included trials had to compare an exercise intervention with a control or another exercise intervention, and assess performance-based measures of physical function such as mobility and gait, or disability in ADL.

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