The Southeastern Ontario Regional Ethics Network invites you to join presenter Shirley McLaren on Feb. 21st from 12-1pm for an Ethics Education Session at Ongwanada, Room 410/411, 191 Portsmouth Ave. Kingston, ON. Videoconference and teleconference is available. To register contact spierce@ongwanada.com.

The Stroke Network of Southeastern Ontario in collaboration with Queen's University are offering this Interprofessional Primary Care team workshop on Wednesday May 10th from 12-4:30 pm as an accredited group learning activity at the Belleville Travelodge. Please see the pdf brochure for more details.  Register online here

The Stroke Network of Southeastern Ontario in collaboration with Queen's University are offering this Interprofessional Primary Care team workshop on Friday, March 31st  from 12-4:30 pm as an accredited group learning activity at the Brockville Convention Centre.  Please see the pdf brochure for more details.  Register online here.

This prospective randomized clinical trial took place at 10 North American medical centres. Lung function in relation to smoking cessation among smokers with mild-to-moderate airway obstruction was examined and measured annually for 5 years. Findings show that smokers with airflow obstruction benefit from quitting, despite previous heavy smoking, advanced age, poor baseline lung function, or airway hyperresponsiveness. 10 Pages.

National Non-Smoking Week is January 18-24th 2016. This page provides tips on how to start the conversation about quitting smoking with your health-care provider. Remember to celebrate your success!

Older adults suffer a large proportion of health consequences from smoking and could benefit from cessation.

Why is it important?

  • Smoking is a risk factor for lung cancer, heart disease, stroke, chronic respiratory disease and fractures (6)
  • Smoking is the leading cause of premature death (5)
  • Rate of bone-density decline in older adults is accelerated by smoking (4)
  • Female smokers are at greater risk of post-menopausal osteoporosis (4)
  • Smoking cessation later in life adds years to life and also improves quality of life (1) (2)

Common Causes

  • Stress of unemployment,  homelessness, personal problems, financial strain, or physical/verbal abuse (8)
  • Addiction to alcohol, cocaine, or heroin can make one vulnerable to smoking (8)
  • Older smokers are less likely to believe smoking harms health or cessation offers benefits at advanced age (1)

Key Considerations

  • Talk to your physician about current smoking status: amount smoked, previous experience with quitting, other influential factors (e.g. addictions/medications/psychiatric problems), current interest in quitting, and any concerns (3)
  • Discuss appropriateness of smoking cessation products/medication with physician (e.g.  nicotine patch, nicotine gum, nicotine inhaler, nicotine lozenge, nicotine mouth spray, varenicline, bupropion, etc) (7)
  • Take advantage of alternative treatments such as counseling, group therapy, community smoking cessation programs- ask your family health team for information
  • Discuss strategies with health care staff to help manage stress, avoid weight gain, deal with setbacks (7)
  • Get involved in the plan to quit smoking and identify areas in which you will need help: choose a quit date, decide on a quit method, know your triggers, conquer cravings, manage withdrawal, build social supports, and control/maintain a “smoke-free” environment (7)
  • Friends and family can help by asking what they can do, being understanding and available, avoiding nagging, and celebrating success (7)
  • Those ready to quit can get support- QuitNow provides online forums and resources for caregivers/family members (7) (http://www.quitnow.ca/)

References



1. 
Brenner, H ,Gellert, C., Holleczek, B., Müller, H. & Schöttker, B.  (2013). Impact of smoking and quitting on
     cardiovascular outcomes and risk advancement periods among older adults
. European Journal of Epidemiology,
     28(8), 649-658.  Retrieved Feb. 2014 from:
     http://www.citeulike.org/user/denraymachin/article/12629715

2.  Health Canada. (2002). Healthy Aging: Tobacco Use and Smoking Cessation Among Seniors

     Retrieved February 26, 2014 from:
     http://publications.gc.ca/collections/Collection/H39-612-2002-5E.pdf

3.  Statistics Canada. (2012). Current Smoking Trends. Retrieved February 26, 2014 from:  
     http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/82-624-x/2012001/article/11676-eng.pdf

4. 
Statistics Canada. (2012). Smoking. Retrieved February 26, 2014 from:
     http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/82-625-x/2013001/article/11844-eng.htm

5. 
The Lung Association. (2014).  Quit Now. Retrieved February 27, 2014 from:
     http://www.quitnow.ca

6.  World Education. (2009). From the First to the Last Ash: The History, Economics & Hazards
     of Tobacco
. Retrieved February 26, 2014 from:
     http://healthliteracy.worlded.org/docs/tobacco/Unit3/1why_people_smoke.html

Older adults suffer a large proportion of health consequences from smoking and could benefit from cessation.

Why is it important?

  • Smoking is a risk factor for lung cancer, heart disease, stroke and chronic respiratory disease (7)
  • Smoking is the leading cause of premature death; heavy smokers can lose about 9 years of life expectancy (6)
  • Older smokers are at greater risks because they have smoked longer: 61% of senior non-smokers are actually former smokers;  and they tend to be heavier smokers as 86% smoked daily (7) (1)
  • Cessation later in life adds years to life and improves quality of life: e.g. risk of myocardial infarction and stroke is reduced by 40% or more  within 5 years after the last cigarette (1) (2)
  • Intensive smoking cessation treatment has been shown to significantly reduce re-hospitalization (9)

Common Causes

  • Stress of unemployment,  homelessness, personal problems, financial strain, or physical/verbal abuse (10)
  • Addiction to alcohol, cocaine, or heroin can make one vulnerable to smoking (10)
  • Older smokers are less likely than younger smokers to believe smoking harms health or cessation offers benefits at advanced age (1)
Smoking Cessation Best Practice Champion Workshop

The Registered Nurses’ Association of Ontario (RNAO) invites all nurses, nursing students and other health care professionals to attend a FREE one day workshop on Smoking Cessation Best Practice