This category of user includes the Nursing role (APN, RN, NP), Phsyiotherapy, Occupational Therapy and other affiliated roles.

Highlights of this issue include a reading list on "Older Adults & Health Issues Related to Season or Climate", updates from Age-Friendly Communities Ontario Outreach Initiative, Baycrest, Brainxchange, Bruyère Research Institute, Ontario Neurotrauma Foundation and Senior Friendly Care. Information about CABHI, Ontario Sport and Recreation Communities Fund and the Health and Well-Being Grant funding opportunities as well as a listing of upcoming events are included. Sign up to receive Linkages directly here.

Thursday, January 11th from 12-1pm, Dr. Andrea Iaboni will list dementia-related falls risk factors, describe evidence-based falls prevention approaches in the advanced stage of dementia and an approach to person-centred falls management and palliative care in advanced dementia. This presentation will be available via webcast at http://webcast.otn.ca.

On Thursday January 25th from 12-1pm EST, presenter Marcia Sokolowski will help attendees identify the major benefits and challenges of advance directives, recognize staff moral distress, how to respond supportively and to identify the relevant ethical issues and principles and where conflict exists between them.  This presentation is available via webcast at http://webcast.otn.ca

On Tuesday, January 16th from 12-1pm EST, Dr. Theodore D Cosco will discuss his experiences with longitudinal research over his career, some of the advantages of longitudinal research, notable longitudinal studies, and his ongoing work on resilience and healthy ageing.  Dr. Cosco will discuss how and why longitudinal studies provide a unique richness and depth of information in the investigation of the ageing process, touching on some of the relative advantages on extant ageing studies, notably the Cognitive Function and Ageing Study, the National Survey of Health and Development, and the Canadian Longitudinal Study on Aging. Dr. Cosco will also touch upon some of his ongoing research examining biopsychosocial trajectories of ageing, particularly with respect to the methodological approaches and practical applications of these concepts. Register here.

This reading list provides links to and summaries of a variety of open source resources on chronic health issues and the older adult. Resources included are related to Canadian population studies, supporting self-management, disease/condition specific publications and reports from around the globe. 3 pages.

This article discusses a number of considerations for managing multimorbidity in people with chronic respiratory conditions including: the use of care planning, addressing polypharmacy, comorbid mental health conditions, and drug reactions, factors such as gender and socio-economic status, health promotion /opportunistic screening and shared decision making.

This report reviews the impact of depression on the lives of older adults in Canada and the Chronic Care Model (CCM) as a framework for improving the management of conditions like depression. The authors set out to identify barriers and facilitators to the implementation of chronic care intervention models for late-life depression in different Canadian primary care settings and then to test and evaluate strategies to overcome those barriers. 

This publication describes a survey of older adults with chronic health conditions seen in primary care regarding the daily spiritual experiences (DSE), perceptions of health, pain, energy and depression. The authors concluded that an increase in DSE may be associated with more energy and less depression.

This article discusses strategies for improving adherence to treatment plans which includes the promotion of simplified medical regimes, the use of aids and more.

The authors state that the current health care system relies on the assumption that older populations have well-developed skills required for self-management of chronic disease. Clinicians must acknowledge the relationship between cognition and self-management and improve their ability to identify and respond to the causes of treatment non-adherence particularly as they related to dementia.

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