Highlights of this issue include a reading list on "Older Adults & Health Issues Related to Season or Climate", updates from Age-Friendly Communities Ontario Outreach Initiative, Baycrest, Brainxchange, Bruyère Research Institute, Ontario Neurotrauma Foundation and Senior Friendly Care. Information about CABHI, Ontario Sport and Recreation Communities Fund and the Health and Well-Being Grant funding opportunities as well as a listing of upcoming events are included. Sign up to receive Linkages directly here.

This reading list provides links to and summaries of a variety of open source resources on chronic health issues and the older adult. Resources included are related to Canadian population studies, supporting self-management, disease/condition specific publications and reports from around the globe. 3 pages.

This report from the Primary Health Care Advisory Group in Australia details the evidence for change and makes recommendations for the broad adoption of a new model of care and reforms to better meet the needs of those with chronic and complex health care needs. Many insights and recommendations may prove insightful for providers in other parts of the world.

This article discusses a number of considerations for managing multimorbidity in people with chronic respiratory conditions including: the use of care planning, addressing polypharmacy, comorbid mental health conditions, and drug reactions, factors such as gender and socio-economic status, health promotion /opportunistic screening and shared decision making.

This report reviews the impact of depression on the lives of older adults in Canada and the Chronic Care Model (CCM) as a framework for improving the management of conditions like depression. The authors set out to identify barriers and facilitators to the implementation of chronic care intervention models for late-life depression in different Canadian primary care settings and then to test and evaluate strategies to overcome those barriers. 

This article discusses strategies for improving adherence to treatment plans which includes the promotion of simplified medical regimes, the use of aids and more.

The authors state that the current health care system relies on the assumption that older populations have well-developed skills required for self-management of chronic disease. Clinicians must acknowledge the relationship between cognition and self-management and improve their ability to identify and respond to the causes of treatment non-adherence particularly as they related to dementia.

This paper discusses the literature on single disease state self-management with an aim of identifying potentially useful approaches for supporting complex chronic disease (CCD) self-management. They discuss negotiation of the goals of care, communicating with patients, engaging patients in behaviour change, reducing information processing burden, minimizing the negative impact on health-related quality of life and suggestions for future research.

This study involved exploring the use of a simple tool to elicit older adults’ health come priorities to help the decision making process regarding different treatment options.

The authors undertook a population-based retrospective study set in Ontario in an attempt estimate the attributable costs of multimorbidity and assess whether the association between the level of multimorbidity and health system costs varies by socio-demographic factors in young (<65 years) and older (≥65 years) adults. They found that there was a positive association between health care costs and levels of multimorbidity that was significantly stronger for older than younger adults.

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