The majority of cancer incidence and mortality occurs in individuals aged older than 65 years, and the number of older adults with cancer is projected to significantly increase secondary to the aging of the US population. As such, understanding the changes accompanying age in the context of the cancer patient is of critical importance.

This webinar presented by Louise Hanvey provides an overview of what Advance Care Planning (ACP) is, fosters understanding as to why ACP is important for patients with prostate cancer, teaches patients and/or their families and caregivers the steps involved in the ACP process, and how to start these types of conversations, as well as familiarize participants with the available resources on ACP.

Although liver disease is stereotypically linked to alcohol or drugs, the truth is that there are over 100 known forms of liver disease caused by a variety of factors and affecting everyone from infants to older adults. This website provides information about liver disease, liver health and resources and links for health care professionals.

This page from the Public Health Agency of Canada provides general information on chronic respiratory diseases. It also provides other resources related to chronic respiratory diseases such as facts and figures, knowledge development and exchange, initiatives, strategies, systems and programs, and links to other resources.

Cancer starts with small changes in the body’s cells or group of cells (1). Healthy functioning cells grow, work, multiply and die according to signals from its genes (1). However, if these signals are damaged or missing, cells can grow and multiply too much and form a lump in the body called a tumour (1). Malignant (cancerous) tumour cells are able to spread to other parts of the body (1). Benign (non-cancerous) tumours do not spread and are not usually dangerous (1).

It is important to find cancer early so treatment can start as soon as possible (2). Becoming informed about cancer and knowing what to do if you have the disease are important parts of treatment (3). The Canadian Cancer Society has resources to help with this, including supports and services that are offered in your province or territory (3).

There are many healthy habits that can reduce the risk of getting cancer:

  • not smoking and avoiding second hand smoke,
  • following a balanced and nutritious diet,
  • getting regular exercise,
  • protecting yourself from ultraviolet (UV) light from the sun and refraining from the use of tanning beds,
  • being tested for signs of the disease (screening) (3)

References

(1)  Cancer Research UK. (2017). What is cancer? Retrieved from  https://www.cancerresearchuk.org/about-cancer/what-is-cancer/how-cancer-starts

(2)  Canadian Cancer Society. (2018). What is cancer? Retrieved from http://www.cancer.ca/en/cancer-information/cancer-101/what-is-cancer/?region=on

(3)  Public Health Agency of Canada. (2018). Cancer. Retrieved from https://www.canada.ca/en/public-health/services/chronic-diseases/cancer.html

Cancer is a disease that mostly affects Canadians aged 50 and older. Cancers are named after the part of the body where they start. For example, cancer that starts in the bladder but spreads to the lung is called bladder cancer with lung metastases. Cancer is the leading cause of death in Canada and is responsible for about 30% of all deaths.

Why is it important?

  • An estimated 187,600 new cases of cancer and 75,500 deaths from cancer will occur in Canada in 2013.
  • The number of estimated new cases does not include 81,700 new non-melanoma skin cancer cases.
  • 96,200 Canadian men will be diagnosed with cancer and 39,400 men will die from cancer.
  • 91,400 Canadian women will be diagnosed with cancer and 36,100 women will die from cancer.
  • On average, over 500 Canadians will be diagnosed with cancer every day.
  • On average, over 200 Canadians will die from cancer every day.
  • Lung, breast, colorectal and prostate cancer are the most common types of cancer in Canada (excluding non-melanoma skin cancer). Based on 2013 estimates: these cancers account for over half (52%) of all new cancer cases.
  • Prostate cancer accounts for about one-quarter (26%) of all new cancer cases in men.
  • Lung cancer accounts for 14% of all new cases of cancer.
  • Breast cancer accounts for about one-quarter (26%) of all new cancer cases in women.
  • Colorectal cancer accounts for 13% of all new cancer cases.
  • Across Canada, cancer incidence rates vary because of differences in the type of population, risk  factors (including risk behaviours) and early detection practices.  Similarly, rates of cancer death vary because cancer screening rates and the availability and use of treatment vary across the country.
  • Survival rates vary from low to high depending on the type of cancer and other factors.  For example, based on 2006–2008 estimates: The 5-year relative survival rate for
    •   lung cancer is low (17%).
    •   colorectal cancer is average (65%)
    •   prostate cancer (96%)
    •   breast cancer (88%)

References

  1. Canadian Cancer Society.  Retrieved March 2014 from: 
    http://www.cancer.ca/en/cancer-information/cancer-101/what-is-cancer/?region=on

This information sheet provides information about skin cancer, types, risk factors, what to look for, and how to protect the skin. Local, regional and provincial contact information is provided. 4 Pages.

This information sheet provides information about prostate cancer screening, risk factors, screening methods and recommendations. Local, regional and provincial contact information is provided. 5 Pages.

This information sheet provides information about colon cancer screening, risk factors , testing and screening recommendations. Local, regional and provincial contact information is provided. 6 Pages.

This information sheet provides information about cervical cancer screening, risk factors and screening recommendations. Local, regional and provincial contact information is provided. 4 Pages.

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