This reading list provides links to and summaries of a variety of open source resources on chronic health issues and the older adult. Resources included are related to Canadian population studies, supporting self-management, disease/condition specific publications and reports from around the globe. 3 pages.

This report reviews the impact of depression on the lives of older adults in Canada and the Chronic Care Model (CCM) as a framework for improving the management of conditions like depression. The authors set out to identify barriers and facilitators to the implementation of chronic care intervention models for late-life depression in different Canadian primary care settings and then to test and evaluate strategies to overcome those barriers. 

This reading list provides links to and summaries of a variety of open source resources on health issues related to season or climate. Resources on depression, insomnia, dry skin, environmental pollution, climate change, temperature and influenza are included. 3 pages. 

The authors of the RCT concluded that they found greater improvements in depression, health-related quality of life, and memory, as well as decreases in the inflammatory marker, CRP, in older depressed participants receiving escitalopram with Tai Chi Chih compared to those receiving escitalopram and health education.

This article discusses the impact of light on the human circadian system, seasonality of human cognitive brain function, immunity and physiology. The authors touch upon the use of light therapy for geriatric depression and the importance of learning more about the circadian system in aging to improve cognitive function, mood, and sleep in relation to dementia.

This article provides an overview of considerations regarding the use of light therapy in older adults as a treatment for insomnia, for behavioural symptoms and depression.

This study found that Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) scores were positively correlated with months of institutionalization and that scores on the GDS decreased significantly during the 10,000 lux treatment. The authors concluded that this may be an effective nonpharmacological treatment for institutionalized older adults.

Odd or frustrating behaviors around clean clothes, bathing, oral care, hairstyling, and shaving seldom come "out of nowhere." Usually there's a trigger, and ways to work around it. Topics include wearing dirty clothes, forgetting to bath, and trouble grooming. 

The winter holiday season (and the colder months which accompany it) can intensify feelings of sadness which aging seniors often experience. Most often it is not the holiday itself that cause these types of emotions among the elderly, rather the fact that the holidays tend to bring memories of earlier, perhaps happier times.

The holidays can be a great time for family togetherness and traditions, but they can also be lonely and difficult for those who have experienced losses. When it comes to holidays and the elderly, those who have lost spouses and have experienced a lot of life change can be especially prone to loneliness and depression. If you’d like to make the holidays a bit more special for your elderly loved one, or just for elders in your community, here are some ideas from our experts on holidays and the elderly.

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