Electronic Frailty Interprofessional Toolkit resource

The research article provides an update on changes to the Canadian Preventive Care Checklist (PCC) Form© including updates on vitamin D and calcium supplementation, depression screening and lifestyle modifications in obese patients, blood pressure targets in hypertension, dyslipidemia screening, and new vaccination recommendations from the National Advisory Committee on Immunization (NACI). 5 Pages.

Wed. Aug. 29th from 12-1PM EDT. Join Michelle Grinman of the University of Calgary and Greta Cummings of the University of Alberta as they discuss a project aimed to develop a triage tool for Long-term Care Homes, similar to e-INTERACT in the United States to proactively identify residents at risk of transfer to emergency departments and/or death in the greater Toronto area with a potential for spread across Canada. To learn more or to register click here.

The authors of this article discuss the close associations of frailty and physical and functional impairment with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and the implications for improving diagnostic acuity of MCI and targetting interventions among cognitively frail individuals to prevent dementia and disability. 

Wed. Feb. 14, 2018 from 12-1pm EST. Join Ada Tang and Christina Nowak of McMaster University as they talk about their work to test the safety and feasibility of a new, higher-intensity strength training program in pre-frail older adults. Register here.

Frailty is a well known and accepted term to clinicians working with older people. The study aim was to determine whether an intervention could reduce frailty and improve mobility.

“Arthritis” means inflamed joint and is a term used to describe a group of diseases and conditions that cause pain, stiffness and swelling in a person’s joints or other parts of their musculoskeletal (muscle and bone) system (1).  Arthritis is a leading cause of disability in Canada and is most common in older adults (1). 

There are several types of arthritis including osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and gout (1). Most types of arthritis are characterized by pain, aching, stiffness and swelling, which weaken the structure and functioning of affected joints (1).This can make simple tasks a challenge and disrupt daily routines. Osteoarthritis is the most common type experienced by older adults and is usually present in the joints of the hands, knees, hips and spine (2).

Participation in physical activity is necessary for a healthy musculoskeletal system. Low-impact exercise such as walking, cycling and swimming help keep joints flexible and strengthen the muscles that support them (2). Additionally, maintaining a healthy weight will help protect joints by avoiding excess stress on them during daily tasks. The use of canes, grab bars and larger handles can help those living with arthritis manage their daily activities. As part of an arthritis management strategy, physicians might also recommend medication to reduce pain (1). Discuss your needs with your health care team.

References

(1)  Government of Canada. (2011). Chapter 1: Life with arthritis in Canada: A personal and public health challenge – What is arthritis and how common is it? Retrieved from https://www.canada.ca/en/public-health/services/chronic-diseases/arthritis/life-arthritis-canada-a-personal-public-health-challenge/chapter-one-what-is-arthritis-and-how-common-is-it.html

(2)  Health Canada. (2008). Seniors and aging – Osteoarthritis. Retrieved from http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/hl-vs/alt_formats/pacrb-dgapcr/pdf/iyh-vsv/diseases-maladies/seniors-aines-ost-art-eng.pdf

This form describes how to use the 5-Item Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) screening tool. 1 Page.

This 5-Item Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) screening / assessment tool is used for identifying depression in older adults. Applicable for a wide range of settings and can be used with older adults including those with mild to moderate cognitive impairment. 1 page.