Highlights of this issue include a reading list on "Health & Indigenous Elders,” updates from AGEWELL, Baycrest, Brainxchange, Bruyere Research Institute, Canadian Centre for Activity and Aging, Centre for Studies in Aging and Health, Gilbrea Centre for Studies in Aging, Institute for Life Course & Aging, National Institute on Ageing, Ontario Age-Friendly Communities Outreach Program, Ontario Neurotrauma Foundation, Ontario Osteoporosis Strategy and Regional Geriatric Program of Toronto, Schlegel-UW Research Institute for Aging and SE Research Centre.

Information about funding opportunities and calls for abstracts from AGE-WELL, Canadian Hospice Palliative Care, Canadian Insitutes of Health Research, Canadian Frailty Network, Government of Canada, Ontairo SPOR SUPPORT Unit, Parkinson Canada, Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council are included.  A number of upcoming events and educational opportunities are listed. Sign up to receive Linkages directly here.

The Centre for Studies in Aging & Health was pleased to feature PhD Candidate Atul Jaiswal for this free Research & Innovation in Aging Forum webinar introducing the condition of dual sensory loss or deafblindness. The characteristics, epidemioogy and impact of dual sensory loss on life were explored. The unique participation experiences of three categories of individuals in this population was discussed. 

This global report from the World Federation of the Deafblind seeks to start a dialogue between international disability rights and development stakeholders and is on based on research combining the largest population-based analysis of persons with deafblindness. 66 pages. Last reviewed September 2018. 

This presentation was given by Dr. Parminder Raina on May 25, 2018 and reviewed highlights of the key findings and baseline data from the Canadian Longitudinal Study on Aging.  40 slides. Last reviewed May 2018.

This report presents key findings on physical, mental, and social aspects of aging using data collected from 50,000 Canadians aged 45-85. It highlights insights related to: physical and psychological health, loneliness and social isolation, caregiving and care receiving, transportation and mobility, work and retirement, physical function, disability and falls, lesbian, gay and bisexual aging, and lifestyle and behaviour, among others. 210 pages. Last reviewed May 2018.

Thurs. May 24th from 12-1 PM EST. Join Kate Dupuis as she presents Geriatric Medicine Rounds and discusses the importance of considering hearing health in an aging population, recent research linking hearing loss to cognitive and physical comorbidities.  This presentation is available via OTN TSM number 72791846 and webcast at http://webcast.otn.ca.

Wed. April 11, 12-1pm EST. This webinar introduces dual sensory loss in seniors and provides strategies to improve communication, positive interactions and accessible environments. Register here.

Hearing loss is an important health concern which is often unrecognized and undertreated. Hearing loss can have many emotional and social consequences including social isolation, depression, safety issues, mobility limitations and reduced income and employment opportunities. In older adults, hearing loss has also been shown to be associated with poor quality of life and functional limitations.

The aim of this study was to estimate the expected years lived with hearing impairment, vision impairment, and dual sensory impairment among older adults.

Hearing loss should be considered at the earliest stage of assessment for dementia.  It is essential for supporting patients and families, and it may prove important for treatment and risk reduction.

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